United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
World Conference for 3600 UNESCO Clubs in the world to meet in Paris

UNESCO is organizing a World Conference for the UNESCO Club movement at Paris Headquarters from July 18 to 20 (Room IV). The Conference will bring together 350 representatives of the approximately 3600 clubs around the world, whose volunteer members share a commitment to UNESCO’s work and ideals. In conjunction with the Conference, the World Congress of the World Federation for UNESCO Clubs, Centres and Associations (WFUCA) will hold an extraordinary session. It will mark the renewal of the international NGO to federate this civil society movement, “the peoples’ UNESCO”.

UNESCO Clubs, first launched in 1947 in Japan and now existing in 84 countries, work in partnership with National Commissions for UNESCO and provide an opportunity for individuals from civil society, particularly young people, to participate in the Organization’s work at community level. The UNESCO Clubs movement can play a key role in mobilizing citizens’ actions in favour of the Organization’s objectives and priorities.

During the Conference, participants will review the current state of UNESCO Clubs and discuss future prospects, with a view to strengthening the network and boosting its impact, in line with UNESCO’s 60th anniversary celebration later this year. Representatives of National Federations from each region will present their clubs’ experiences and highlight their activities. These activities, aimed to further UNESCO goals, vary according to members’ age, interests and means of action. Typically, they range from stimulating debate about human rights among high school students and disseminating information about UNESCO ideals to projects on environmental protection, HIV/AIDS prevention education, literacy promotion and safeguarding cultural and national heritage.



 
Author(s) UNESCOPRESS
Source Media Advisory No. 2005-50
Generic Field
Russian
Editorial Contact: tel. +33 (0)1 45 68 17 48
Publication Date 15 Jul 2005
© UNESCO 1995-2007 - ID: 28369